Travel Tips for Optimum Health and Wellbeing

Everyone knows that being sick is not the best way to start off a holiday. However with all that traveling to the airport, sitting in the unhealthy environment that is the airplane cabin, using pushcarts that thousands of other people have touched, it’s almost impossible not getting sick from flying. Airports are magnets for an array of bacteria and viruses, but there are certain guidelines that people should follow in order to stay as healthy as possible during their travels.

Continue Reading

PrintEmail

How fit do I need to be?

Fitness and mental ability is the key ingredients for trekking in the Himalayas. Most people have a good level of fitness for their age, and first time trekkers are usually concered that they won't be able to keep up. It is not all about keeping up but, taking your own time and setting your own pace. You will soon discover after a couple of days with lots of ups and downs that you will become fitter with each step.. Having said all this it is imperative that you train before your trek, by under preparing, not only are you robbing yourself of an enjoyable experience, but letting down the team of people you will be trekking with.

Continue Reading

PrintEmail

Altitude sickness

Altitude sickness is not generally a problem below 3000m. The secret to avoiding it is to walk at your own pace and take adequate rest days.  Sedatives and alcohol aggravate altitude headache. Most walking in Nepal is up and down and a lot of it is steps. Try and do a lot of pre-trip exercise on steps. My trekking schedules have been carefully designed to minimise the effects of altitude.

Continue Reading

PrintEmail

Trip Gradings

My treks are graded as being "introductory", "moderate" moderate plus” and challenging  the classification is determined by various degrees of difficulty, length of trek, altitude and number of hours of walking each day. This 10 day trek is classed as “moderate” and can be undertaken by anyone who has an  average level of fitness and is prepared to increase their fitness by doing daily regular exercise at least 3 months before their trek.

PrintEmail

Health & Vaccinations

Travel Medicine is not our area of expertise, but we believe it is very important to get the right advice and preparation to ensure you have a successful journey Many adventure destinations expose people to unfamiliar environments. These risks are easily managed provided you have up to date pre - departure health information and maybe even immunisations, and a travellers medical kit. We strongly recommend all our clients seek EXPERT advice about the best way to safeguard their health while away. These days there are specialised Travel Medicine Doctors that are familiar with the exact risks in the various countries, regions and itineraries etc and how to best manage those risks.

Continue Reading

PrintEmail

More on Altitude sickness

Notes by Dr. J. M. Duff

When we ascend above 2500 meters our bodies have to acclimatise to the decreasing amount of oxygen available. Most people ascending above this altitude will experience some or all of the following list of symptoms for a few days until they acclimatise.

Continue Reading

PrintEmail